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Short ribs, soup and pasta recipes

Here are some recipes I made over the weekend, but didn’t get a chance to write about:

 

Short Ribs

As much as I love my beef stew recipe, this may be just usurped it’s position as best cold weather-meaty-stick-to-your-ribs fare. It’s similar to the beef stew, but less cooking time. R really loved making sandwiches with the leftovers. He called them McShortRibbies (groan now).
 

Braised Short Ribs with Red Wine Gravy Bon Appétit | September 1999

 

Tiring of the ultra-refined nouvelle cuisine that epitomized eighties dining, cooks rediscovered the comforting humble cuts such as short ribs and shanks. Orecchiette pasta or mashed potatoes are great to catch the gravy.

 

Yield: Makes 6 servings

 

1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon (generous) ground allspice
12 3- to 4-inch-long meaty short ribs (about 5 1/2 pounds), top membrane trimmed
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 large onions, chopped
3 large carrots, peeled, chopped
3 large celery stalks, chopped

4 large garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon dried thyme
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
8 ounces plum tomatoes, chopped
3 small bay leaves
3 cups canned beef broth
2 cups dry red wine

Chopped celery leaves

 

Stir flour and allspice in medium bowl to blend. Sprinkle short ribs all over with salt and pepper. Add 6 ribs to flour mixture and turn to coat. Heat 3 tablespoons oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add floured ribs; saut) until brown, turning occasionally, about 6 minutes. Transfer to large bowl. Repeat flouring and browning with remaining 6 ribs; reserve remaining flour-coating mixture. Add 1 tablespoon oil to pot. Add onions, carrots and celery stalks; saut) until vegetables begin to brown and are very tender, scraping bottom of pot often, about 30 minutes.

 

Add garlic, thyme and caraway seeds to pot; stir 1 minute. Mix in tomatoes and bay leaves. Return ribs and accumulated juices to pot, arranging ribs in single layer. Add broth and wine. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until meat is almost tender, about 1 hour.

Uncover pot. Simmer ribs 30 minutes, occasionally spooning fat from surface; reserve 2 tablespoons fat. Stir reserved flour-coating mixture and reserved 2 tablespoons fat in small bowl until smooth; mix paste into sauce around ribs. Simmer until meat is very tender and gravy thickens, about 45 minutes longer. Season with salt and pepper.

Transfer short ribs and gravy to large bowl. Sprinkle with celery leaves.

 

Add garlic, thyme and caraway seeds to pot; stir 1 minute. Mix in tomatoes and bay leaves. Return ribs and accumulated juices to pot, arranging ribs in single layer. Add broth and wine. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until meat is almost tender, about 1 hour.

 

Uncover pot. Simmer ribs 30 minutes, occasionally spooning fat from surface; reserve 2 tablespoons fat. Stir reserved flour-coating mixture and reserved 2 tablespoons fat in small bowl until smooth; mix paste into sauce around ribs. Simmer until meat is very tender and gravy thickens, about 45 minutes longer. Season with salt and pepper.

Transfer short ribs and gravy to large bowl. Sprinkle with celery leaves.

.

Bacon and Cabbage Soup

This was a soup I thought about making for the pumpkin party, but ultimately decided against it. Good thing too, as it was only an okay soup. Although, to be fair, I modified the recipe, using real bacon instead of Irish and I did not want to bother pureeing it. If you try the full recipe, let me know how it goes.

 


Bacon and Cabbage Soup Epicurious | March 2007


In Ireland, boiled bacon and cabbage is a domestic staple. The bacon is usually a "collar" or shoulder, a moderately marbled cut with less fat than American bacon but a bit more than Canadian. The ingredients are boiled together and served with potatoes and a parsley cream sauce.

Among contemporary Irish chefs, it's become popular to reinvent this hearty, homey recipe in the more rarefied form of bacon and cabbage terrine. Flynn's version, however, stays closer to dish's comforting roots, while adding a touch of elegance.

Yield: Makes 4 servings

 

1 (1/3-pound) piece Irish bacon (available at specialty foods shops) or Canadian bacon
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice
5 1/2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth
4 Turkish bay leaves
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 small head Savoy cabbage, cored, thinly sliced, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces

 

In small saucepan, combine bacon and cold water to cover. Cover, bring to boil over moderate heat, and skim foam from surface. Reduce heat and simmer 7 minutes. Drain and cool, then cut into 1-inch chunks. Set aside.

In 6-quart heavy stock pot over moderate heat, melt butter. Add onion and sauté, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and sauté 2 minutes. Add stock, bay leaves, salt, and pepper and bring to boil. Reduce heat to moderately low, cover, and simmer until potatoes are soft, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add cabbage and simmer 5 additional minutes. Discard bay leaves. Working in 3 batches, in blender purée soup until smooth (using caution when blending hot liquids). Return to pot, stir in bacon, and rewarm if necessary. Ladle soup into bowls and serve.



Penne alla vodka

 

This was an excellent variation on your plain, boring tomato sauce. The sauce has a nice kick from the crushed red pepper and the cream gives it body. I don’t know what the vodka is doing, but I know that it’s good. It’s quick and easy to make, especially if you use crushed tomatoes and skip all that fussy business with the food processor.
 

So that the sauce and pasta finish cooking at the same time, drop the pasta into boiling water just after adding the vodka to the sauce. If possible, use premium vodka; inexpensive brands will taste harsh in this sauce. Pepper vodka imparts a pleasant flavor and can be substituted for plain.

Ingredients

1

(28 ounce) can whole tomatoes , drained, liquid reserved

2

tablespoons olive oil

1/2

small onion , minced (about 1/4 cup)

1

tablespoon tomato paste

2

medium cloves garlic , minced or pressed through garlic press (about 2 teaspoons)

1/4-1/2

teaspoon hot red pepper flakes

 

Table salt

1/3

cup vodka

1/2

cup heavy cream

1

pound penne pasta

2

tablespoons minced fresh basil leaves

 

Grated Parmesan cheese , for serving

Instructions

1.      1. Puree half of tomatoes in food processor until smooth. Dice remaining tomatoes into 1/2-inch pieces, discarding cores. Combine pureed and diced tomatoes in liquid measuring cup (you should have about 1 2/3 cups). Add reserved liquid to equal 2 cups.

2.      2. Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion and tomato paste and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are light golden around edges, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and pepper flakes; cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

3.      3. Stir in tomatoes and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Remove pan from heat and add vodka. Return pan to medium-high heat and simmer briskly until alcohol flavor is cooked off, 8 to 10 minutes; stir frequently and lower heat to medium if simmering becomes too vigorous. Stir in cream and cook until hot, about 1 minute.

4.      4. Meanwhile, bring 4 quarts water to boil in large Dutch oven over high heat. Add 1 tablespoon salt and pasta. Cook until just shy of al dente, then drain pasta, reserving 1/4 cup cooking water, and transfer pasta back to Dutch oven. Add sauce to pasta and toss over medium heat until pasta absorbs some of sauce, 1 to 2 minutes, adding reserved cooking water if sauce is too thick. Stir in basil and adjust seasoning with salt. Divide among pasta bowls and serve immediately, passing Parmesan separately.

 

 

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